Indie Comic Roundup #4: Sons of God and Job Dun, Fat Assassin!

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So, it’s been a while (way too fucking long is a more accurate description) since the last Indie Comic Roundup. I’ve been a pretty busy guy these last couple months.

The Escape From Jesus Island crew has recovered from its technical disaster (which cost us close to 6 months of production time) and production of issue #3 has really ramped up. It’s tentatively scheduled for an Easter release.

In January 2015, I joined forces with Artist/Writer Joseph Schmalke to edit his killer, indie grindhouse mini-series The Infernal Pact. Our first collaboration (issue #0) has been printed and is being sent out to Kickstarter backers this week. We’ve begun production on issue #2 of the series, so, look for that soon.

I spent much of January completely revamping not only my business model, but the services I offer. This change reflects the evolution of my creative focus, skill set, and a desire to follow a path that is personally rewarding.

So, there are my (rather justified) excuses for the tardiness in writing the newest ICR feature. With that said, let’s get to the comics! This time around, there is only two comics featured, but I don’t think they’ll disappoint in their uniquness.

First up, the absolutely insane (and incredibly interesting)…

Sons of God

Sons of God #1 Cover. Art by Jojo. All rights reserved.

Sons of God #1 Cover. Art by Jojo. All rights reserved.

Sons of God, created and written by Father/Son duo Jojo & John, is…I’m going to let them explain. Because, well, you’ll see…

Like “Axe Cop” in reverse, here is the Horror/Comedy story by a young illustrator (14 year old Jojo), and his dad (writer John). It’s a comic book series about BIG TROUBLE for planet earth, but no one can see it unless they truly believe in it…

Jojo, the 14-year-old Artist of the comic Sons of God.

Jojo, the 14-year-old Artist of the comic Sons of God.

In the company’s 100th year, the Sons of God are making a move: Captains of Industry with a controlling interest over everything, they have voted to scrap all of Creation, and start over with much cooler subjects this time. But the vote was not unanimous… one Son stands against their plans to liquidate all holdings on this Earthly plane, because, well, he likes everything just the way it is. Give the Devil his due, there’s going to be one hell of a power struggle, and you’re not going to like the outcome. ..

“Sons of God” is all about insanity. Specifically, it is about religious mania, holy delusions, and sacred nightmares. The story raises more questions than answers: (eg. Which Son is our savior, and which our mortal enemy?) The story follows our hero Stan: a wandering Hitchhiker who records his travels with a beta version of Google Glass.

Stan, the lead character from the Sons of God. Artist Jojo. All rights reserved.

Stan, the lead character from the Sons of God. Artist Jojo. All rights reserved.

Stan often happens to arrive at just the right moment, like when TV cameras are about to roll. His first introduction to a very susceptible world audience comes when he rescues an innocent homeless orphan from a pack of murderous, bloodthirsty nuns bent on ritual sacrifice.

The Evil Nuns. A page from the comic Sons of God. Artist Jojo. All rights reserved.

The Evil Nuns. A page from the comic Sons of God. Artist Jojo. All rights reserved.

The story also follows the parallel path of the maniacal, psychotic, barefoot Jehovah’s Witness, Mr. Frost, who is pursuing his own bizarre obsessive quest. Along the way, we glimpse Frost’s version of the story, as told in his own self-published private monthly edition of “The WatchTower.”

Sons of God. The WATCHTOWER. Art by Jojo. All rights reserved.

Sons of God. The WATCHTOWER. Art by Jojo. All rights reserved.

Meanwhile, high in the world’s most exclusive Penthouse/boardroom/wildflower meadow, Stan’s brother Jesse and the rest of the Sons of God plan and bide their time. The Board of “The Kingdom” is venal, disillusioned, and world weary. In order to scrap the entire company and liquidate all Earthly assets, they need a unanimous vote. But Stan, the black sheep of the family, has rejected their corporate life of luxury, and prefers to protect the status quo. The Board’s efforts to find Stan and force him to sign have been futile.

Jesse and the Sons make one last desperate play to force Stan to join them in a new Paradise, despite the gnawing knowledge that the Old Man would not take kindly to their demolition of the world he built himself from scratch. But no one’s seen the old man in aeons…

Or is it the story of one poor, unsound man… who imagines a realm populated with religious beings, Gods with unimaginable powers; and who hallucinates wild adventures and seismic clashes…

Page from the comic Sons of God. Artist Jojo. All rights reserved.

Page from the comic Sons of God. Artist Jojo. All rights reserved.

Yeah so, there it is. In all it’s glorious weirdness! It’s so amazingly out there, that all I can do is applaud it’s crazy! Ooh, and urge you all to support their Kickstarter campaign HERE!! Come on, who doesn’t want to see this story through til’ the end?!? This is wild creativity in it’s purest form. It’s comic and outsider art history in the making!

For a more in-depth look at the project, check out their Facebook page HERE.

Next up, the extremely rotund adventure of…

Job Dun, Fat Assassin

Job Dun, Fat Assassin_Cover #1. Art by Ben Michael Byrne. All rights reserved.

Job Dun, Fat Assassin_Cover #1. Art by Ben Michael Byrne. All rights reserved.

To be honest, I don’t know a whole lot about this comic. But I sure want to! Written by Mark Hobby and illustrated by Ben Michael Byrne (with colors by Noelle Criminova & Owen Watts, and lettering by Dave ‘Bolt-01’ Evans) and released under Spray Comics, Job Dun, Fat Assassin, surely reminds me of a R. Crumb book with the eye test. So, I’m interested in giving it a read to see how it plays out.

Panel from Job Dun, Fat Assassin. Art by Ben Michael Byrne. All rights reserved.

Panel from Job Dun, Fat Assassin. Art by Ben Michael Byrne. All rights reserved.

Here’s the blurb about Job Dun on ComiXology…

“Bizarro sci-fi, action-adventure tale about a rotund gun-for-hire and his adventures in the town called Ink-blot. Influenced by comics like Judge Dredd and Strontium Dog and authors like Steve Aylett and Philip K Dick, its a starkly satirical take on what happens when digital tech and old fashion bastard-narcissism meet.”

But what really caught my attention, was a review about the book on Comics Online by Jayden Leggett. Here is the part that piqued my interest…

“An ultra-violent and highly sexual sci-fi noir romp rife with foul language and starring an overweight gun-for-hire who is in desperate need of a larger shirt. Suffice it to say, Job Dun: Fat Assassin #1 is impossible to pigeonhole into any one specific genre.”

“As the title suggests, Job Dun: Fat Assassin #1 by Spray Comics follows the expletive-riddled exploits of obese mercenary Job Dun. From what I can tell (and I could easily be incredibly wrong about this), Dun lives in a place where reality truly is subjective to the eye of the beholder, thanks to a special device called a “spray-maker”. In a nutshell, the spray-maker is embedded in the pineal gland of the user’s brain, and allows its host to “spray paint” their own reality into an aesthetic appearance of their choosing. Seems that Job Dun is quite the horny bastard indeed, as his “Perve” setting transforms his surroundings into all sorts of smut. Gimps, strippers, big-breasted nymphs and so on are common sight within the pages of this comic.

Like I stated earlier, I could be very wrong about the reality in which Job Dun resides, and this is largely due to the narrative mechanic that is created by the book’s presence of the spray-maker. This is largely because I still don’t fully understand how it works, despite the brief description given within the panels of the book. Is everything the reader sees the result of Dun’s own spray-maker? Is the sexy buxom redhead who hires Dun really buxom and sexy, or is this all due to Dun’s spray? Or is it due to her own spray which she has put in place to make herself appear buxom and sexy? What is real? What is an illusion? All of these were questions that arose as I read this comic, but by the end of the book, I was clear on one thing: to fully enjoy Job Dun: Fat Assassin #1, one must live by the following mantra: “Just go with it”. For by going along with the ride, you shall be rewarded with one hell of a good time.”

To read the full review, go HERE.

A page from Job Dun, Fat Assassin. Art by Ben Michael Byrne. All rights reserved.

A page from Job Dun, Fat Assassin. Art by Ben Michael Byrne. All rights reserved.

For your copy of Job Dun, Fat Assassin, visit ComiXology HERE or their store HERE.

So there you have it, round four of the Indie Comic Roundup is complete! As always, please take a few minutes to visit these projects, and see if they’re something you’d like to support. Until next time…

Art the World!
-Savage1

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