Larger Than Life! The Sculpture of Katharina-Fritsch!

Kind mit Pudeln (Child with Poodles) 1995 Plaster, chromium-plated brass, color 15 3/4 x 208 inches. Art copyright Katharina Fritsch.

Kind mit Pudeln (Child with Poodles) 1995 Plaster, chromium-plated brass, color 15 3/4 x 208 inches. Art copyright Katharina Fritsch.

Contemporary German Sculptor Katharina Fritsch takes on relatively ordinary subjects in new, and often times jarring, ways. Most notably is the size of her works. Though many are meant specifically for museums, the size and scope of these works make a real impact. A couple perfect examples of that are her Child with Poodles (above) and Company at the Table (below). The first, Child with Poodles, has rows of poodles facing in at a single child. This thick ring of objects creates a barrier between the viewer and the child, creating a dark or sinister feel to the piece. The second work, Company at the Table, leaves a haunting impression on many levels. The identical, faceless people and the size of scale (over 50 ft long!) leave quite an impression. Cold, soulless and impersonal.

Tischgesellschaft (Company at the Table) 1998. 4 ft. 7 in. x 52 ft. 6 in. x 5 ft. 9 in. Art and Image copyright Katharina Fritsch.

Tischgesellschaft (Company at the Table) 1998. 4 ft. 7 in. x 52 ft. 6 in. x 5 ft. 9 in. Art and Image copyright Katharina Fritsch.

Katharina Fritsch is known for her sculptures and installations that reinvigorate familiar objects with a jarring and uncanny sensibility. Her works’ iconography is drawn from many different sources, including Christianity, art history and folklore. She attracted international attention for the first time in the mid-1980s with life-size works such as a true-to-scale elephant. Fritsch’s art is often concerned with the psychology and expectations of visitors to a museum. Gary Garrels wrote that “One of the remarkable features of Fritsch’s work is its ability both to capture the popular imagination by its immediate appeal and to be a focal point for the specialized discussions of the contemporary art world. This all too infrequent meeting point is at the center of her work, as it addresses the ambiguous and difficult relationships between artists and the public and between art and its display—that is, the role of art and exhibitions and of the museum in the late twentieth century.”
-Katharina Fritsch’s Wikipedia Entry

Rattenkonig 1993 Polyester resin, paint 110 1/4 x 511 3/4 inches. Art and Image copyright Katharina Fritsch.

Rattenkonig 1993 Polyester resin, paint 110 1/4 x 511 3/4 inches. Art and Image copyright Katharina Fritsch.

So, Katharina-Fritsch, for your slightly creepy work and your interesting point of view Give Us Art! salutes you!

Savage1
Savage1Studio.com

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Comments

  1. caren jones says:

    The woman on the picture with the green jumper is NOT Katharina Fritsch. Please amend your credit line.

    Like

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